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Math Centers

My students engage in five math centers a week (1 per day for 30 minutes).  I love that during this time that they feel like they are playing...hooray!  My five centers are called Games, Facts, Sort, Movement and Computer.  The students get to select where they go and I check it off on a spreadsheet, I love to give them freedom (to an extent). 

For computer time we are currently using abcya.com.  This sight has some great activities for the kids and it is also kid friendly (no pop-up adds, etc.). Comment if you have a great sight that your students like to frequent!

The following are links to the activities I have created for my kids.  Click on the pink link to download the documents for free :)

Roll dice for sum, find equation nearest to your piece that matches the sum.















I printed these documents, framed them in cheap Dollar Tree Frames and hung them in our math area.  We write on them with dry erase marker....I love them!


Spin, Subtract and Color, provided two spinners for each student. I have mine labeled 1 & 2.  On 1, I have numbers 11-18 and on 2, I have numbers labeled 0-10 (purchased at Dollar Tree).  The students spin and subtract and then color the difference.


Spin and Graph- Each student will need copies of the playing mats, a graph, a cookie sheet and a top.  The student will lay the playing mat onto the cookie sheet, spin the top, solve the equation and fill in the graph for the sum of the  equation.


Shinning Stars Subtraction- Each student needs a playing mat (several are included), cubes, a die and a recording sheet.  Directions are attached.


Part Part Whole Addition- Students will cut out pieces, glue and solve.



Bunches of Beads- Students will get out an ice tray and beads.  The will read the label adhered to the bottom of each section.  The students will use beads to figure out the sum of the equation listed on the label.  The students will solve, write and illustrate.


Candy Cane Race, Addition-   2 players will separately add two candy canes together to get a sum.  The person with the greater sum colors in a section of their candy cane.  The first candy cane colored indicates the winner.


Domino Addition, Ten Frame- Use dominoes to represent the problem in a ten frame.  Cut the dominoes at the bottom of the page.  Color one side red and the other side blue (of the domino).  Fill in the ten frame using the colors/numbers on the dominoes. Then fill in the equation.







For this activity, enlarge playing board.  Each player takes three erasers, tosses them, and adds the numbers together.




Dice, adding one or two more- Students and/or teachers can create these dice.  In this partner game, two players take turns rolling the dice, writing the equation and then solving with counters.

The first idea I got from Mrs. T's First Grade Class!  I changed it to include an addition problem.  {The second page of the document has ten rods to copy and use.}
The other ideas are straight from my head after going over our series, the content and our roadmaps.











My class is comparing numbers this week and next. I created these items to help guide them along.

I am going to laminate this mat for partners to work with.  I will give them a set of 3 numbers to write in the top boxes.  Then they will make dots on the numbers and write the numbers in order in the bottom boxes.

Here are some Math Centers from before that correlate with this lesson.
Baseball Bonanza - Place Value


Adding and Subtracting with Place Value Centers and Place Value Addition Mat
Who stole the Cookies?
Float on Love
We Love Cookies!


Hog Heaven - Number lines
 
Racing Forward - Greater Than, Less Than




Math Vocabulary:











True and False Addition Equations





https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIMGVCNzZBSWR0T3c/edit?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIMGVCNzZBSWR0T3c/edit?usp=sharinghttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIMGVCNzZBSWR0T3c/edit?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIZC1BdDVCZGVzU0k/edit?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIZC1BdDVCZGVzU0k/edit?usp=sharinghttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIZC1BdDVCZGVzU0k/edit?usp=sharing


And here are 2 centers on balancing equations:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIdXM4Z2MxRTQ5OUU/edit?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIdXM4Z2MxRTQ5OUU/edit?usp=sharinghttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIdXM4Z2MxRTQ5OUU/edit?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIN3ZabFg1c0t5UWc/edit?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIN3ZabFg1c0t5UWc/edit?usp=sharinghttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIN3ZabFg1c0t5UWc/edit?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIQ3BYaURoaHZ5LWM/edit?usp=sharinghttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIQ3BYaURoaHZ5LWM/edit?usp=sharinghttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIQ3BYaURoaHZ5LWM/edit?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIQ3BYaURoaHZ5LWM/edit?usp=sharing




The students will drop 3 pencil cap erasers onto the board.  Draw the three animals the erasers land on.  Add up the amount of legs (three addends).  Then take one animal {and their legs!} away.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIME9xdUJEYUFfQWc/edit?usp=sharinghttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIME9xdUJEYUFfQWc/edit?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIME9xdUJEYUFfQWc/edit?usp=sharing

Go Nuts!  For this game you will yell out GO NUTS!
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIUVJGNGt5NFFhTjA/edit?usp=sharing
-Print out numbers on a page like I did above.  Depending on where you are within your standards you could print 0-10 or 0-20.  Print multiple copies to make a TON!
-Cut out the boxes and have the kids help you crumble them all up.
-The kids sit in a circle facing out.  I usually have mine sitting with their white board, marker and eraser for a place to work and solve.
-Spread out the crumbles in the middle of the circle.
-Yell BOO!, the kids will grab some crumbles are begin to solve.
-After they solve the problem on their boards they hold it up.  I use this game as a formative assessment.

There are many, many uses for this game!  Last week they added 3 addends (so they grabbed three crumbles), commutative property, add doubles (grab one and double), and doubles plus one (grab one and add the next number higher). You could also use it for count on, count back, fact families, etc.


Here are math story problems for each type of CGI problem that don't have numbers in them (11 in all).  They are great for following Kassia's Math Exchange.  Click on the picture to pick up your copy.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxyFB6bkDkQIWnV0NEI5U185WFE/edit?usp=sharing

(Click on the link above or the picture.  It will take you to Google Drive.  
Go to File, then to Download and then it is all yours!)

18 comments:

  1. Thank you for all of these great ideas! I will definately be using some of these in my own math centers!

    Second Grade Math Maniac

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  2. Wow! This is a great collection of math station ideas! Thanks for sharing!
    -Audrey
    acolwell.blogspot.com

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  3. How do you hang the frames without nails so they are secure?? We would not be allowed to use nails.

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  4. I secured ribbon to the frame and then to the star with hot glue. I pinned the star to the bulletin board with tacks. It has held up all year! Another suggestion I have is putting velcro around the edges or using command strips :)

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  5. Did you come up with the "MATH" acronym on your own? Is there some place that I can read up on it at? Or do you have a post that goes into detail about it and what you do for each letter? I am looking for a way to make better use of my math time. THANK YOU!

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  6. Hi, I'm an Elementary Education major. I'm a junior in college. I have a question to ask. When we talk about one math center, does that mean we only use one activity? I have an assignment to come with three centers. I've chosen Math, Science, and Social Studies as my centers. My professor has asked to state purpose of each station and describe one activity. I would like additional feedback. although I did drop in an email to my professor. I would like to know whether it means I come up with one activity for each center? For example, I have chosen magnets for Science center. Is that counted as one activity or I have to include multiple activites within each center?

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  7. Thank you Miss. Willis for sharing,
    I am student teaching in a first grade class in Tacoma Washington. Your resources have been helpful. Do you have any resources on linear measurement? Thank you!

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  8. These are wonderful. Thnks so much for sharing. Math centers are a huge part of our math time and I am always looking for new center games.

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  9. these are great! great math sites I have found are www.carrotsticks.com and www.scootpad.com

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  10. Wow! This is wonderful. Thank you

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  11. This is an awesome collection. I wanting to start math centers and this has given me great ideas.

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  12. Found this by sheer accident. Awesome and thanks for sharing. I loved the odd and evens scavenger hunt

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  13. According to me Basic Math Practice a lot of advantages for your child’s social, intellectual and physical development. Choose the right intellectual fun games, math games that would boost their potential and make them achiever on their own.

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  14. You have a great collection. I found this while I was going thru various Math blogs. I maintain a Math blog where I add mostly the stuff i use to teach my daughter. Currently she is in Grade 2 and I have worksheets for 1st and 2nd Graders. I always love Math games and most of the time, I end up teaching my daughter thru games and she just loves it.

    Thanks for posting.

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  15. Where is the pink link to download all of the centers?

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  16. Hi, Thank You for sharing this post. Its nice to know the adding and subtraction in math center

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  17. Wow! What an awesome collection of math centers. Thank you!

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